A daily dose of Inspiration for you!

Humanitarianism is kindness, benevolence/helpfulness, and sympathy toward others.  Humanitarians can inspire others for many reasons.  Perhaps they shed light on something that needs or deserves more attention.  Perhaps they inspire you to do something in your life that is beneficial to others or even that is helpful or productive in your own life.  Whatever the outcome, humanitarians can be inspiring.  There are humanitarians that are ranked highly historically.

 

Raisa Gorbacheva was the wife of Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.  She was a philosopher, educator, author, and humanitarian.  During her life she was a new model for wives of communist leaders, worked to preserve Russian cultural heritage, foster new talent, and raised funds for treatment of children’s blood cancer.

 

Raisa Maximovna Titarenko was born in Rubtsovsk, Altai Krai, Russian SGDR, Soviet Union.  She had two younger siblings.  She grew up and went on to study philosophy in Moscow.  She earned an advanced degree from Moscow State Pedagogical Institute.  She went on to teach and meet Mikhail Gorbachev at Moscow State University.

 

Mikhail and Raisa married in 1953.  They moved to Stavropol where she continued to teach. Raisa gave birth to their only child, a daughter, in 1958.  They moved back to Moscow due to Mikhail’s work in politics and Raisa taught at Moscow State University.  When he became the leader of the Soviet Union, she left her teaching position.

 

Raisa kept a public profile.  In 1990, she even did a commencement address with US First Lady Barbara Bush at Wellesley College in Massachusetts.  She published the book I Hope in 1991. The Soviet Coup of 1991 pushed Mikhail Gorbachev out of power.

 

In 1999, Raisa was diagnosed with leukemia.  She had treatment, yet died a couple of months later.  In 2006, the family founded the Raisa Gorbacheva Foundation.  This foundation raises funds to support families whose children have childhood cancer.  Be inspired!  Have a bright day!

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